Most famous English poets : Top 10 Most greatest English poets and writers

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Here is the list of the top 10 most famous English poets and writers of all times now we are going to discuss the top 10 most famous English poets and writers all the time.

Celebrated on March 21st every year also World Poetry Day observes the sensitive flow of words, rhymes, and rhymes from poets around the world. Celebrated on March 21st every year, World Poetry Day celebrates the sensitive flow of words, rhymes, and rhymes from poets around the world. It celebrates poetry, a fine representation of one’s cultural and linguistic manifestations.

See a list of the Top all time Most famous English poets and writers

10. Charles Dickens

Charles John Huffham Dickens (born February 7, 1812 – died: June 9, 1870) was one of the most popular English poets and novelists of the nineteenth century. He regarded one of the best historians of the Victorian era.

During his lifetime Charles Dickens was able to gain much popularity and fame related to his forerunners.
His popularity remains intact even after his death. His main reason is that Dickens produced a number of well-known novels and characters in English literature.

Most of his works published in monthly installments in newspapers and magazines. Charles Dickens has also contributed to popularizing essays in this way. Other writers would finish the novel before the sequel was published, but Dickens would compose the following chapters as soon as the installment was released.

In this way, writing a novel would show a certain rhythm in the story of his novels. The last of the chapters was mysterious, for which readers would look forward to reading the next installment. His books and novels are so popular that they have never been out-of-print. Leo Tolstoy, George Orwell, G. Who Chesterton has praised Dickens’ work for its realism, humor, prose, characterization and social-reforming spirit.

On the other hand, Henry James, the author of the Virginia Wolf, accuses Dickens’s writings of sentimentality and unrealistic imagination. He has authored several famous novels in literary life, most notably David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations and more.

9. Charlotte Brontë 

Charlotte Brontë was a teacher. She worked with her two sisters as a writer, Emily, and Annie.

In 1847, Bronte published the semi-autobiographical novel Jane Eyre, it was a hit and also it would become a literary classic.

His other novels included Shirley and Whittle. He died on 31st March 1835 in Howarth, Yorkshire, England.

8. John Keats

John Keats (October 31, 1795-February 23, 1821) is a romantic famous English poets of English literature. He was one of the second generation romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Vishi Shelley.
Only four years before his death, his works were published. His poetry did not attain a very high standard in the eyes of the then critics.

After his death, his poems began to receive proper evaluation and in the late nineteenth century, he was recognized as one of the most popular English poets.

Its influence is seen in the numerous poets and writers of the future. According to Horace Louise Bourhaas, the first introduction to Keats’ writing was one of the most critical events in her literary life. John Keats was born in 1795 in a stable in London. His father was a stables keeper.

His father died in 1804. After Kitts’ father died his mother remarried, but in 1810 his mother died of tuberculosis.

7. John Milton 

John Milton was the greatest poets in English Literatur, pamphleteer, and historian who considered the most notable English author after William Shakespeare. Milton is best known for Paradise Lost, best known as English’s greatest epic. Together with Paradise Raised and Samson Agonistes.

As a result, It confirmed Milton’s renown as one of the best poets in the world. In his prose composition, Milton favored the abolition of the Church of England and the execution of Charles I. the beginning of the English Civil War in 1642 to the re-establishment of King Charles II in 1660. He established a political philosophy in all his works that opposed oppression and state-affiliated religion.

Its impact continues not only through civil war and interconnectedness but also to the American and French revolutions. In John Milton’s essay on theology, he noted the importance of freedom of conscience, the importance of scripture as a guide to faith, and religious tolerance toward unbelievers.

As a civil servant, Milton became the voice of the English Commonwealth after 1649 through the management of his international correspondence and the government’s defense against police attacks from abroad.

6. Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde was an Irish playwright and greatest poets. Author Oscar Wilde was known for his acclaimed work, including ‘Pictures of Doreen Gray’ and ‘The Importance of Being Generous’, as well as his brilliant wit, sparkling style and his infamous imprisonment for homosexuality.

After graduating from the University of Oxford, he lectured as a poet, art critic and a leading advocate of aesthetics principles. In 1891, he published the portrait of Dorian Gray, his only novel that was panned by Victorian critics as immoral but is now considered one of his most notable works.

As a playwright, many of Wilde’s plays are his most famous play and play, including the satirical comedy Actress Lady Windermere’s Fan(1892), A Woman of No Importance (1893), An Ideal Husband and The Importance of Being Earnest. Common in his writings and life, Wilde’s relationship with a young man, led to his arrest in 1895 on charges of “gross indecency”. He imprisoned for two years and died in poverty three years after released at the age of 46.

Read More… Oscar Wilde Biography

5. Robert Burns

Robert Burns was born in 1759 in Alave William and Agnes Brown Burns in Scotland. Like his father, Barnes was a tenant farmer. However, at the end of his life, he became a collector of the abbot at Dumfries, where he died in 1796; He was a practicing poet all his life.

His poems record and observe the aspects of farming, regional experience, traditional tiger culture, class culture and individualism, and religious practice. He is Regard as the national poet of Scotland. Although he was not ready for the title, he clearly and repeatedly expressed his desire to be a Scots bard.

4. Rudyard Kipling; IF

Rudyard Kipling was born in India in 1865 and studied in England but returned to India in 1882.

A decade later, Kipling married Caroline Balestier and settled in Brattleboro, Vermont, where he wrote The Jungle Book (1894), where he succeeded in several works.

Kipling received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1907. He died in 1936.

3.William Shakespeare the Great English Poets

William Shakespeare (Baptism April 26, 1564; died April 23, 1616) was the most famous English poets and playwright. He is considered to be one of the greatest English poet and writers and the world’s leading playwright. William Shakespeare was also known as the “National Poet” of England and the “Bard of Avon”.

His works include 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long anecdotes and several other poems. Some of the writings William Shakespeare wrote jointly with other writers. Shakespeare’s plays translated into every Important living language and staged more often than any other playwright’s work. Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon.

William Shakespeare married Annie Hathaway when she was just eighteen. Shakespeare had three children in Anne’s womb. They are Susan and Hamnet and Judith are twins. Between 1585 and 1592 he gained considerable fame in London as an actor and playwright. William Shakespeare co-owned by a playwright named Lord Chamberlain’s Man. This company was later known as King’s Men.

In 1613

William Shakespeare removed from the theater and returned to Stratford. He died there three years later. Documentary information about Shakespeare’s personal life is not available. There has been a great deal of research on his appearance, sexual orientation, religion, or even the plays written by him in his name or the works of others.

Most of Shakespeare’s works staged between 1589 and 1613. His earliest works were mostly melodramatic and historical plays. By the end of the sixteenth century, in his skill, these two genres rose to the middle of artistic and nobility. Then, until 1608, he composed mainly tragedies.

His Hamlet, King Lear, and Macbeth are some of the best English language writers in this section. In the latter part of his life, he devoted himself to writing Tragedy. These works also known as romance. During this time he also worked on several plays jointly with other playwrights. The quality and credibility of publishing plays in his lifetime have not been the same everywhere.

In 1623 two of his former dramatists published the first folio of Shakespeare’s entire theatrical work, excluding two plays. In Shakespeare’s time, Shakespeare was an honored poet and playwright. But after his death, his reputation began to decline. It finally rose to prominence in the nineteenth century. The Romantics were appreciative of his compositions.

The Victorians worshipped him ritually; In the language of George Bernard Shaw, “bardolatry”. Even in the twentieth century, research and theatrical representations sought to replicate his work from different perspectives. Even today his plays are extremely popular and well known. These plays staged and interpreted in many different cultural and political contexts around.

2. Sylvia Plath (Alternative Title: Victoria Lucas)

Sylvia Plath acclaimed as one of the most prolific and famous American poets of the twentieth century. Born in the United States of America in the early 1930s, she credited with advancing the genre of confessional poetry.

She was equally famous for his short stories and novels. She began writing early in her life and published her first poem at the age of eight, her first national publication at the age of eighteen, and at the age of twenty-one, she elected guest editor of Mademoiselle. However, she failed to accept rejection in a healthy way and, at the age of twenty-three, attempted suicide.

Nevertheless, she completed his studies and moved to England, where she met and married Ted Hughes. She first lived in the United States, but later returned to England, where she continued to write. She published her first poem at the age of eighteen. It was, in fact, one of only two books published during his life; All the others published after his suicide at the age of thirty.

1. W.B Yeats The Greatest Author

William Butler Yeats (June 13, 1865 – January 28, 1939) was an Irish poet, and He was a key figure in twentieth-century literature.

Born in Ireland in 1865, William Butler Yeats published his first work in the mid-1880s when he was a student at the Metropolitan School of Art in Dublin.

His first achievements include plays like The Wanderings of Oisin and other poems (1889) and counters Kathleen (1892) and Deirdre (1907). In 1923 when he received the Nobel Prize in Literature. He wrote more influential works, including The Tower (1928) and Words for Music Yes and Other Poems (1932).

Yate died in 1939, known as one of the major western poets of the 20th century.

Some of the more famous English poets

  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 1772 to 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher, the Romantic movement founded in England with his friend William Wordsworth. He was the Lake Poet. S.T Coleridge was best known for his poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan.

Biographia Literaria is one of the critical essays he has created. His critical work on Shakespeare was very influential, and he helped to introduce the German prophetic philosophy into English-speaking culture. He invented many familiar words and phrases, including the famous suspension of disbelief. It had a special effect on Emerson and American mysticism.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge suffered from anxiety and depression throughout his adult life; It is thought he suffered from bipolar disorder, which remains unknown during his lifetime. Coleridge was in poor health, originating from arthritis and childhood illnesses. Due to all these illnesses, he treated with opium lacquer (laudanum), which resulted in opium addiction throughout his life.

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